Ranked Choice Voting is Bad News!

Advocates are pushing Ranked-Choice Voting at nearly every local and state level. Why? Proponents claim that Ranked-Choice Voting allows voters to express their preferences for multiple candidates and ensures that the ultimate winner is the candidate with the most overall support rather than just the one with the most first-choice votes. While this may sound nice in theory, in practice, it’s a scheme allowing candidates with a minority of voter support to win through mathematical technicalities. Here's what you need to know about how Ranked-Choice Voting really works and the dangers it brings.

Live Free TV: What You Need to Know About Ranked Choice Voting

LTC Allen West welcomes Phil Izon from the Ranked Choice Education Association. After seeing firsthand the confusion caused by the system in Alaska, Phil decided to get involved. Listen in to learn how Ranked Choice Voting (RCV) is confusing, challenging to audit and often leads to third-place candidates "winning." You might be surprised to discover who is behind the nationwide effort to make RCV the standard.

The Latest Election Scam: Ranked-Choice Voting

Have you ever wondered what happened in Alaska during the 2022 midterm election? How is it that a congressional district that had long been held by Republicans since 1971 was suddenly and inexplicably won by a Democrat? How is it that of the last three candidates standing — showcasing two Republican candidates and only one Democrat candidate — neither Republican candidate won that race?This phenomenon in Alaska can be explained by ranked-choice voting.

Jason Snead: The Ranked-Choice Voting Virus Spreads To Utah

"A guinea pig.” That is what Sandy, Utah Mayor Monica Zoltanski said that “ranked-choice voting” (RCV) made of her hometown. The town opted into Utah’s controversial RCV pilot program, but the experiment has not gone well. The cost-saving promised by proponents never materialized, but the real alarm bells should have sounded when the experiment produced voter confusion and voter disengagement.Yet instead of ending this failed pilot program, Utah legislators are now considering a bill to expand ranked-choice voting to primary elections for state and federal office.

Title

Go to Top